Traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus polysaccharide enhanced antitumor effects

Traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus polysaccharide enhanced antitumor effects

Traditional Chinese medicine Astragalus polysaccharide enhanced antitumor effects of the angiogenesis inhibitor apatinib in pancreatic cancer cells on proliferation, invasiveness, and apoptosis

Background: Traditional chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy have shown modest effects on the survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. The current study aimed to investigate the antitumor effects of apatinib, Astragalus polysaccharide (APS), and the combination of both the drugs in pancreatic cancer cells and further explore the molecular mechanisms in vitro.

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What Are Adaptogens and Why Are People Taking Them?

What Are Adaptogens and Why Are People Taking Them?

Adaptogens are non-toxic plants that are marketed as helping the body resist stressors of all kinds, whether physical, chemical or biological. These herbs and roots have been used for centuries in Chinese and Ayurvedic healing traditions, but they’re having a renaissance today. Some, like holy basil, can be eaten as part of a meal, and some are consumed as supplements or brewed into teas.

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Saving Southern Shaolin: Preserving the Ancient Art of Qigong

Saving Southern Shaolin: Preserving the Ancient Art of Qigong

Angela LeeThis article features Angela Lee, our team Acupuncturist.

Her practice is a daily one, and one that constituted an abrupt career change in 1991.

“When I felt and saw the difference in my body from qigong, I felt if everyone in the world knew the practice just a little bit then we wouldn’t be as sick or diseased. To really understand it, I went back to school for my masters in Chinese medicine at thirty years old. To understand the depths of qigong, I needed to understand the depths of Chinese medicine.”

Angela’s commitment to the study is impressive. But it’s the result of her conviction that qigong really does have the capacity to change people’s lives around the world.

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Chinese Herbal Medicine and Cancer: Working Under the Radar

Chinese Herbal Medicine and Cancer: Working Under the Radar

One of the greatest aspects of Chinese Herbal Medicine is that herbs can work “under the radar”.  Herbal medicine in general does not get a lot of notoriety from conventional medicine because herbs are not isolated substances that target a specific biochemical response; they are very hard to study because they are whole (i.e. very complex), natural substances (like the human being!) and so have no specific mechanisms of action the way a pharmaceutical does.  Herbs work in a more subtle way – still with a very clear direction, but a direction that takes time.  In this way, they are a match for the subtle, slow development of cancer as a disease process.

What this can mean in treatment is that the herbs are taken in through the digestion and can be metabolized without a dramatic effect.   The body takes the many aspects of the herbs it encounters – constituents, qualities and even irritating or bothersome aspects, to which it reacts, and responds, without expressing an overt change.  Yet, by asking the body to respond in a certain way (over and over a few times a day), by sending a complex, yet subtle, repeating message to which the body in its physiology is enticed to respond, invites a healing action.   Herbs do not work by forcing the body into submission, but by triggering a response, much like giving a nudge to a person so that they notice you and turn around.  This can go unnoticed by the person (but not the immune, circulatory, digestive or lymphatic systems!) and yet taken over time can generate significant long-term effects towards a tsunami of great change; but like a tsunami, the patient doesn’t see it coming.      (more…)

Could Ancient Remedies Hold the Answer to the Looming Antibiotics Crisis?

Could Ancient Remedies Hold the Answer to the Looming Antibiotics Crisis?

One researcher thinks the drugs of the future might come from the past: botanical treatments long overlooked by Western medicine.

On a warm, clear evening in March, with the sun still hanging above the horizon, Cassandra Quave climbed aboard a jalapeño-green 4-by-4 and started to drive across her father’s ranch in Arcadia, Fla. Surveying the landscape, most people would have seen a homogenous mat of pasture and weeds punctuated by the occasional tree. Quave saw something quite different: a vast botanical tapestry, rich as a Persian rug. On a wire fence, a Smilax vine dangled menacingly pointed leaves, like a necklace of shark’s teeth. Beneath it, tiny wild daisies and mint ornamented the grass with pink tassels and purple cornets. Up above, on the sloping branches of oak trees, whiskery bromeliads, Spanish moss and the gray fronds of resurrection fern tangled in a miniature jungle all their own.
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The Chinese medicine Sini-San inhibits HBx-induced migration and invasiveness of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

Sini-San (SNS) is a formulation of four Traditional Chinese Drugs that exhibits beneficial therapeutic effects in liver injury and hepatitis. However, there are no reports describing its effects on the hepatitis B X-protein (HBx)-induced invasion and metastasis in hepatoma cells, and the detailed molecular mechanisms of its actions are still unclear.
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